Mollena's mental thumb-drive, 2.0

adipositivityproject:


What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?
a)  A better than average Friday night
b)  Typical New York City commute
c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series
Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.

adipositivityproject:

What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?

a)  A better than average Friday night

b)  Typical New York City commute

c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series

Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.

Herr Meister = Awesomeness. adipositivityproject:


What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?
a)  A better than average Friday night
b)  Typical New York City commute
c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series
Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.
Herr Meister = Awesomeness.

adipositivityproject:

What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?

a)  A better than average Friday night

b)  Typical New York City commute

c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series

Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.

adipositivityproject:

What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?
a)  A better than average Friday night
b)  Typical New York City commute
c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series
Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.

adipositivityproject:

What has nipple jewelry, a couplefew kisses, half dozen or so tattoos, two buses, a penis, and the Empire State Building?

a)  A better than average Friday night

b)  Typical New York City commute

c)  The Adipositivity Project 2014 Valentine Series

Hint: Ain’t no websitelessness gonna get in the way of love. IT’S HERE! Check adipositivity.com every day through Valentine’s Day for more lovebirds.

We interrupt this program to bring you a commercial message.Namaste, namaste!
I am superfucking picky about reviewing shit, endorsing stuff, reviewing toys,…View Post

We interrupt this program to bring you a commercial message.

Namaste, namaste!

I am superfucking picky about reviewing shit, endorsing stuff, reviewing toys,…

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animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. 

Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. 

After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. 

To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”

For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.

To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.

A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

(via notcuddles)

inxthexmeantime:

I highly recommend this place if you enjoy eating out.

inxthexmeantime:

I highly recommend this place if you enjoy eating out.

(via miggylol)

Permission to be human: granted.I was more anxious than happy when I received an IM from The Composer. It was the middle of the…View Post

Permission to be human: granted.

I was more anxious than happy when I received an IM from The Composer. It was the middle of the…

View Post

missbhavens:

laughingsquid:

Confused Baby Girl Meets Her Father’s Twin for First Time

Freakin hilarious the look on this kid’s face!

So. Cute. And the kid is adorable too.

missbhavens:

super-deduction-im-an-escalator:

vampirewangs:

gankonasan:

monkeysaysficus:

nicoeighty:

monkeysaysficus:

nicoeighty:

milisaz:

Because Cheese Porn

sexiest thing I’ve seen tonight

That lasagne just got me pregnant.

pregnant or bloated?  

Pregnant. My duderus is full of cheesebaby.

Why??? Why?????

Praise be Cheesus

I’m gonna cry

I find the flappy-cheesed burger disturbing. But ALL the others just brought a year to my eye…

CHEESE, BITCHES.

MUTHAFUCKIN CHEESE.

(Source: maleficent-z)

fuckyeahaquaria:

Giant Cuttlefish | Sepia apama
(by Mick’s wet)

This cuttlefish is not interested in your tomfoolery.

fuckyeahaquaria:

Giant Cuttlefish | Sepia apama

(by Mick’s wet)

This cuttlefish is not interested in your tomfoolery.

(via nudiemuse)

museumofmodernerotica said: Maybe this is a crazy question, but how did Europeans know what Africans looked like? I know that some of the paintings here are of North Africans/Middle Easterners, but others clearly depict people born south of the Sahara. I've heard of Prester John but I never imagined that medieval Europeans were aware that Prester John would have had brown skin. Am I missing something?

medievalpoc:

Like. There are a lot of things I could say here. But I’m just going to do my best to answer your question, and the answer is either very simple or very complicated, depending on your current point of view.

1. “They” knew what people with brown skin looked like because people with brown skin had been there literally THE ENTIRE TIME. Some (and father back, ALL) of “them” had brown skin themselves.

2. “People with Brown Skin” and “Europeans” are not separate and mutually exclusive groups.

3. No matter how far back you go, the mythical time that you’re looking for, when all-white, racially and culturally isolated Europe was “real”, will continue to recede from your grasp until it winkles out the like imaginary place it is.

We can just keep going back. In every area, from all walks of life, rich and poor, kings and peasants, artists and iconoclasts, before there were countries and continents, before there were white people.

Russia, 1899:

image

Switzerland, c. 1800:  [fixed link here]

image

Netherlands, 1658:

image

Poland, 1539:

image

Germany, 1480s:

image

Spain, 1420s:

image

France, 1332:

image

Scotland, England, France, 1280s:

image

France, 1220s:

image

England, 1178:

image

Belgium, 1084:

image

Greece, c. 1000:

image

Spain, 850s:

image

Throughout Europe, 800s-500s:

image

England, c. 300 AD:

image

Scotland, c. 100 AD:

image

image

Italy, 79 AD:

image

Greece, 170 B.C.:

image

Greece, 300 B. C.:

image

Greece, 400s B.C.

image

Greece, 500s B.C.:

image

Egypt, 1200s B.C.:

image

Crete (Minoan), 1600 B.C.:

image

Crete (Minoan), early 2000s B.C.:

image

Romania, 34,000 B.C.:

image

The time when “EVERYONE” in Europe was White does not exist. They knew what people with brown skin looked like because they were there. They knew what “Africans” looked like because they were there, and they weren’t “they”, they were us, or you. I think what you’re missing is something that never existed.

chakrabot:

jequitakoyama:

chakrabot:

social-darwin-awards:

chakrabot:

jamietheignorantamerican:

[x]

I was reading this aloud and started SCREAMING WHEN I GOT TO TH END NO IT IS NOT THE SAME DID YOU JUST COMPARE LOOKING SCRUFFY TO BEING BLACK????

just shut up I know you think that you’re proving an enlightening point but you are only enforcing exactly the kind of mindset that keeps that man from showing up at his daughter’s school.

The clothes you wear and your haircut are simply not the same as your skin color. People will look down on you for any of those. But you can change your clothes and your haircut. You can never change your genes. Your clothes and your haircut aren’t who you are. Being Black should not be the same as looking unprofessional. Not ever.

Basically. It’s so fucking hurtful that without a second thought so many white people instantly think it’s totally logical to compare issues of black non-acceptability in society to shit like ‘looking unkempt’.

This is exactly what we are complaining about. Why is black, by default, so easily equatable to ‘messy undesirable?’

Racism is ugly.

I don’t think she was trying to be racist I think she was just not getting it
Like I totally understand her point but she made a really bad analogy because like above peeps said race and clothing choices are veryyyy different
I think she’s stupid, not racist lol

No I agree, she’s not trying to be racist, but that’s actually the problem.

Because she literally did not see how that was a bad analogy. In her mind avoiding letting people know you’re black is the same and just as understandably acceptable as avoiding looking messy or unkempt to her.

Like it’s one thing if someone knows they are racist but when someone says something like this and thinks they are just proving a point about how something isn’t racist, it actually just proves how pervasive racism is in society, that it’s way bigger than just that person, because for no reason did this white woman think twice, she’s entirely unaware of how offensive her words are because in her mind it makes total sense.

And that my friends is the result of institutionalized racism/white supremacy.

(via newwavefeminism)